Queen Anne Style

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When one thinks of Victorian homes, Queen Anne style usually first comes to mind.  This flamboyant and highly decorative style became fashionable in 1880’s and remained popular until about 1910.

Queen Anne homes are often considered romantic, yet this style is a product of rather unromantic times – the industrial revolution.  The advances in materials, technology and transportation enabled prefabricated building elements to be easily produced and shipped across the country.  This allowed builders to combine different materials to create extravagant variations of facade styles, colors and textures.

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Although easily recognized, the Queen Anne style is not easily defined.  The main characteristics include asymmetrical design, intricate decorative woodwork, prominent porches, steep roof with projecting gables and rambling floor plans.  One of the most prominent characteristics is the corner tower or turret, although it is not always on the corner, and sometimes not present at all.

The facade is made of a combination of materials such as brick, wood or stone, and often decorated with shingles and clapboard.  The degree of ornamentation distinguishes the high style form the vernacular, with the more modest single-story versions often referred to as Princess Anne.

What made Queen Anne style popular, namely its detailed decorative features, also caused it to eventually fall out of favor.  These homes turned out to be costly and difficult to keep up, and more down-to-earth styles started gaining popularity in 1910.

Architecture Blog

Starting in 2003, this blog series ran for 11 years.  Click on the images below to read some of the posts.

Dutch Colonial

Dutch Colonial

Georgian

Georgian

Folk Victorian

Folk Victorian

Greek Revival

Greek Revival

Tudor

Tudor

Mission

Mission

Craftsman

Craftsman

International

International