Georgian Architecture

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Georgian style first appeared in England in the early 18th century and became widely popular in that country for the next hundred years.  It was named after four British kings named George (I, II, III and IV) who reigned from 1714 to 1830.  The style quickly spread to the American colonies via architectural pattern books.  The affluent colonists of that time looked to England for fashion tips, and having a home in the fashionable English style was a must for those wishing to show off their wealth and sophistication.

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Georgian homes are easily identified by their imposing, symmetrical, two-story façade, usually made of brick or wood.  Double-hung windows are arranged in rows of five (sometimes three) and are also symmetrical.  The front door commonly is decorated with pediment and pilasters.  There is very little roof overhang, and the cornice at the roof is most often dressed up with dentils.

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The interior of a Georgian home is also designed to look formal and imposing.  The grand hallway leads to each room on the main level, and the central staircase leads to the second floor.  There are either two or four fireplaces present, depending on the size of the home.  Walls are decorated with molding, and classical details are present throughout the home.

In America, Georgian style fell out of favor after the American Revolution for the same reason it became popular – its association with England.  However, the style was revived at the beginning on the 20th century due to the renewed interest in colonial past.  This new period of Georgian architecture is commonly referred to as Colonial Revival.

Architecture Blog

Starting in 2003, this blog series ran for 11 years.  Click on the images below to read some of the posts.

Dutch Colonial

Dutch Colonial

Queen Anne

Queen Anne

Folk Victorian

Folk Victorian

Greek Revival

Greek Revival

Tudor

Tudor

Mission

Mission

Craftsman

Craftsman

International

International